HAPPY
WITH
YOUR
SERVICE?
Happy With Your Service?

Please let us know

Call Us
YESNO
Tag Archives: griffin eye clinic

A Clearer Picture of Cataract Surgery: Why Lasik Might not be the Answer

October 17th, 2016

Category: Takle Eye Group

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

Cataract Surgery: Why Lasik Might not be the Answer

When your vision is less than perfect, it’s easy to jump at a popular treatment, expecting it to be the one for you. Lasik, for example, is the most commonly performed vision correction surgery. It is a highly effective procedure, but for people over age 50 with vision issues it might be worth talking to your doctor about cataract surgery before you go in for Lasik. Once you understand how both cataract surgery and Lasik work, it’s easy to see how important it is to choose the right procedure for your condition.

Cataracts are a clouding of the lens of the eye. They can distort or obscure normal vision. Often, patients will complain of a “film” over the eye, or halos forming around light sources. The only effective treatment of a cataract is surgical removal of the lens.

Cataract surgery is one of the most common and successful surgeries performed in America, with nearly 99 percent of outcomes resulting in improved vision. During cataract surgery, the eye’s natural lens is removed and is replaced with an artificial lens.

Lasik, while it can be helpful in conjunction with cataract surgery, can’t be used alone to treat cataracts. During Lasik, the surgeon uses a laser to reshape the clear refractive bump on the front of the eye, called the cornea, so that light coming into the eye is focused correctly.

Cataracts can’t be improved with laser treatment, but Lasik can be used to address poor vision post-surgery. This generally isn’t necessary, however, as the technology for artificial lenses greatly reduces the likelihood of a patient’s vision needing further adjustment.

So which treatment is right for you? Speak to your eye doctor about any vision issues you may be having, and together you can determine the correct treatment for your needs. Takle Eye Group offers patients a state-of-the-art eye surgery facility and the latest no-stitch small-incision surgical techniques. Schedule your appointment online or by calling 770-228-3836 and find out what we can do to improve your vision.


Take a Hike: Protecting Your Eyes in the Great Outdoors

October 10th, 2016

Category: News Optical Center Takle Eye Optical

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

takeye_smgraphic_take-a-hike

Fall is hiking season, and you’ve likely given plenty of thought to sturdy footwear, suitable clothing, and lightweight gear. But while you’re planning for comfort and protection on the trail, don’t forget your eyes! Being in the great outdoors couldn’t be better than when you’re on nice hike – but so much exposure to the sun, dirt and sand, and other potential dangers could leave your eyes worse for the wear. Luckily, there’s one simple piece of equipment you can bring along to keep your eyes in top condition on the trail: sunglasses.

UV protection is essential for any outdoor activity. You probably know that you need to protect your skin from UV rays, even during regular activities like walking the dogs or mowing the lawn, but do you know the dangers of regularly exposing your eyes to UV rays? Prevent Blindness says that regular exposure may cause macular degeneration – a leading cause of vision loss in older Americans, cataracts, a fleshy growth on the eye called pterygium, and corneal sunburn. Even short-term exposure can cause issues, so the first thing to look for in a pair of hiking sunglasses is UV protection.

Your daily beaters and fashion sunglasses might keep out UVs perfectly well on the trail, but drops and scrapes could leave them useless after just a few hikes. That’s why our second recommendation for a pair of hiking sunglasses is durability. You’re going to drop them; you’re going to fall on them; and you’re probably going to sit on them a few times. Frames made of materials with a little flexibility, or sunglasses designed specifically to flex will be the safest bet for durability.

You want your lenses to be able to hold up too, so that’s why recommendation number three is scratch-resistance. You’ll get grit and sand on them, and you’ll definitely bump into a few trees on a good hike. If your sunglasses rub against a rock or a branch, you don’t want to have a permanent scrape in your line of sight. What fun is a hike if that great view is blocked by a bunch of scratches?

If you’re looking for hiking glasses, we have a few brands and styles you’ll be eager to bring along on the trail. Liberty Sport eyewear is one of our newest brands, and they’re right at home on the field or in the wilderness. We’ve also got Oakleys, in styles that look sharp on the trail or on the street. Visit the Takle Eye Optical showroom or set up an appointment for a fitting at https://www.takleeye.com/optical-center-griffin/ or by calling 770-228-4822


Family History: How Getting to Know Your Ancestry can Save Your Eyes

October 3rd, 2016

Category: News Takle Eye Group

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Family History: How Getting to Know Your Ancestry can Save Your Eyes, Family eye health

Your great-grandmother’s dining room table, your uncle’s old fishing gear, your grandpa’s fried chicken recipe; we inherit a lot of great things from our families. Be aware, though, not everything you inherit from your family is positive. Genetic risk factors are a big part of what your doctor checks for during a regular eye exam, and what you don’t know about your family’s history of eye disease can certainly hurt you. For example, the American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO) says that having one immediate family member with glaucoma makes you four to nine times more likely to develop the disease yourself.

Many eye conditions have genetic factors. Diseases such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD), astigmatism, and cataracts can all be genetic, so knowledge of your family’s eye health history is crucial in early detection and treatment or prevention of these and other genetic eye issues. How can you find out about your family’s eye health history? Ask around! Relatives closest on the family tree are your first resource for determining your own risk. Ask your parents, siblings, and grandparents if they know of any eye problems like glaucoma, astigmatism, nearsightedness, farsightedness, or anything else in the family. Reunions also make for a great family history resource, so don’t be shy about asking aunts, uncles, and everyone else about the state of eye health in your family.

Don’t be so quick to have genetic testing done! The AAO has concluded that tests of such kinds don’t tend to be helpful in detecting and treating eye diseases. If you are really interested in genetic testing for congenital eye diseases, talk to your ophthalmologist. They can tell you about different tests and whether or not available tests might be helpful.

Your family history is important; don’t wait to find out what may be lurking in your genetics! If you are diagnosed with an eye health issue, it is also helpful to share that information with family members so they can let their own care providers know. Keep tabs on any eye issues you hear about among your family, and it just might help your care provider prevent problems for you in the future!

Set up an appointment today by calling 770-228-3836 or schedule your visit online, and speak with one of our doctors about your family’s eye health history. You might be surprised at what your family history has to say about your own eyes!


Introducing iStent® – Our Newest Treatment for Glaucoma

August 31st, 2016

Category: News Takle Eye Group

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

TakEye_SMGraphic_JULY3
Takle Eye Group is proud to present our newest procedure for patients who have cataracts and are also managing glaucoma. iStent® Trabecular Micro-Bypass is the first microinvasive glaucoma surgery (MIGS) device to safely reduce pressure in the eye by creating a permanent opening in the drainage network around the eye (called the trabecular meshwork).

The iStent® is the smallest ever FDA-approved medical device. It’s a snorkel-like tube that’s inserted into the trabecular meshwork during cataract surgery. No additional procedure is necessary. Once inserted, iStent® helps manage the flow of aqueous humor – the fluid in your eye – so that excess pressure in the eye is reduced and the danger of permanent damage is lessened.

iStent® may also decrease the need for some glaucoma medications prescribed to you, though this is at the discretion of your doctor.

If you have glaucoma, are planning for cataract surgery, and would like to discuss iStent® as a potential treatment option, contact us for a consultation at http://www.takleeye.com/contact-us/ or by calling 770-228-3836.

For more information on glaucoma, visit our glaucoma center or read our previous article about the two kinds of glaucoma.

INDICATION FOR USE
The iStent® Trabecular Micro-Bypass Stent (Models GTS100R and GTS100L) is indicated for use in conjunction with cataract surgery for the reduction of intraocular pressure (IOP) in adult patients with mild to moderate open-angle glaucoma currently treated with ocular hypotensive medication.

CONTRAINDICATIONS
The iStent is contraindicated in eyes with primary or secondary angle closure glaucoma, including neovascular glaucoma, as well as in patients with retrobulbar tumor, thyroid eye disease, Sturge-Weber Syndrome or any other type of condition that may cause elevated episcleral venous pressure.

WARNINGS
Gonioscopy should be performed prior to surgery to exclude PAS, rubeosis, and other angle abnormalities or conditions that would prohibit adequate visualization of the angle that could lead to improper placement of the stent and pose a hazard. The iStent is MR-Conditional meaning that the device is safe for use in a specified MR environment under specified conditions, please see label for details.

PRECAUTIONS
The surgeon should monitor the patient postoperatively for proper maintenance of intraocular pressure. The safety and effectiveness of the iStent has not been established as an alternative to the primary treatment of glaucoma with medications, in children, in eyes with significant prior trauma, chronic inflammation, or an abnormal anterior segment, in pseudophakic patients with glaucoma, in patients with pseudoexfoliative glaucoma, pigmentary, and uveitic glaucoma, in patients with unmedicated IOP less than 22 mmHg or greater than 36 mmHg after ?washout? of medications, or in patients with prior glaucoma surgery of any type including argon laser trabeculoplasty, for implantation of more than a single stent, after complications during cataract surgery, and when implantation has been without concomitant cataract surgery with IOL implantation for visually significant cataract.

ADVERSE EVENTS
The most common post-operative adverse events reported in the randomized pivotal trial included early post-operative corneal edema (8%), BCVA loss of = 1 line at or after the 3 month visit (7%), posterior capsular opacification (6%), stent obstruction (4%) early post-operative anterior chamber cells (3%), and early post-operative corneal abrasion (3%). Please refer to Directions for Use for additional adverse event information.

CAUTION
Federal law restricts this device to sale by, or on the order of, a physician. Please reference the Directions for Use labeling for a complete list of contraindications, warnings, precautions, and adverse events.


Protecting Young Eyes – Caring for Your Children’s Eye Health

August 25th, 2016

Category: Takle Eye Group

Tags: , , , , , , ,

TakEye_SMGraphic_JULY2

As a parent, you do everything in your power to make sure your children are healthy. That includes protecting them from injury, making sure their nutritional needs are met, and bringing them to the doctor’s office for the occasional checkup. But how often do you consider the health of your children’s eyes? The National Center for Children’s Eye Health reports that 9 percent of children between 5 and 17 years of age are nearsighted, and 13 percent are farsighted. Further, between 15 and 28 percent of children ages 5 to 17 have astigmatism. Uncorrected vision problems in young children (6 to 72 months of age) can affect their cognitive and visual-motor development, and visual function is a strong predictor of academic performance in school-age children.

The best way to prevent vision-related development issues in your children is to schedule regular vision screenings with your eyecare provider, so that problems can be detected early and treatment can be administered as soon as possible. Infants should have their vision checked as part of regular pediatric checkups for the first three years. Between the ages of 3 and 6, an eye exam every year is recommended. Throughout childhood and the teenage years, exams should be scheduled as necessary.

Of course, not all vision issues are genetic. Proactive protection is the best way to prevent damage to children’s eyes from common accidents and other dangers. Preventblindness.org lists the most common causes of eye injuries to children as:

  • Misuse of toys
  • Falls from beds, against furniture, and on stairs
  • Misuse of everyday objects such as work and garden tools, kitchen utensils, knives, and pens and pencils.
  • Contact with household products such as paint, detergents, glues, etc.
  • Automobile crashes or accidents

Luckily, protecting your child’s eyes from injury involves some steps that you may already be taking, such as using proper occupant restraints (car seats, safety belts) in your vehicles, keeping chemicals out of reach of children, padding the corners of your furniture, and reading the warnings on packaging and toys. In addition to these steps, Prevent Blindness recommends installing locks on floor-level kitchen and bathroom cabinetry, avoiding flying or projectile-throwing toys, installing sufficient stairwell lighting and handrails, keeping BB guns away from children, and stowing or securing any loose objects while driving a vehicle. You can find the full list of recommendations on the Prevent Blindness website.

You should also consider specialized sports eye protection. Swim goggles will protect from irritants in pool or ocean water, and there are goggles and eye shields widely available in children’s sizes for almost every sport. Many sports goggles, especially those with lenses made of polycarbonate, include UV protection. UV protection is an important consideration for everyday protection as well, The Vision Council reports that children generally experience three times as much sun exposure as adults—thus their eyes are more likely to be exposed to UV rays. Protect your children’s eyes in the outdoors by shopping for a suitable pair of sunglasses with them. To be sure your child is more likely to wear their sunglasses, have them pick out a pair they like, make sure the sunglasses fit properly, and look into clip-ons if your child already wears prescription glasses. Be sure that the sunglasses are UVA/UVB protective!

Ensuring the health and safety of your children’s eyes is just one part of being a parent. Takle Eye Group can help make it easier. Call 770-228-3836 or request an appointment online to set up an examination or screening, and trust your children’s eye health to the same providers who care for your own.


Meet Dr. Baumrind

August 18th, 2016

Category: News Takle Eye Group

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Dr. Baumrind M.D.Dr. Benjamin Baumrind M.D. joined Takle Eye Group in July of 2016, as a valuable addition to our retinal surgery team. Dr. Baumrind is board certified with the American Academy of Ophthalmology.

Dr. Baumrind comes from a family of dentists and was on track to join the family business. One day after a pre-dentistry class in college, young Ben was removing his contacts and suffered severe corneal abrasions in both eyes. He was rushed to the ER and was unable to see for three days. During that time, Ben fully realized the pain caused by eye injury and the loss of one’s vision. This experience, combined with a suggestion from his uncle to complete a four-week clinical rotation in ophthalmology, led Ben to pursue a career in eye care.

The precision and speed with which most eye issues can be diagnosed and treated inspires Dr. Baumrind in his practice. He chalks that ease up to the straightforward construction of the eye and the power of the microscope. Often, a doctor is able to literally see what is causing the problem on or inside the eye. Having suffered himself, Dr. Baumrind finds satisfaction in being able to alleviate many eye care issues, even serious ones, often in less than an hour of office time.

Dr. Baumrind earned his bachelor’s of science degree from UGA in 2005, and his M.D. from the Medical College of Georgia in 2009. His residency was completed at the Institute of Ophthalmology and Visual Science in 2013. He most recently completed a two-year retinal surgery fellowship at Eye Consultants of Atlanta in 2014.

Our Griffin offices will be Dr. Baumrind’s primary practice location. He is a surgical retina specialist, treating such conditions as diabetic retinopathy, retinal tears and detachment, macular degeneration, vein occlusions, hereditary retinal issues, and more.

An Atlanta native, Dr. Baumrind is especially interested in serving the unique needs of our community. “If I can be connected to the patients down here,” he says of the region that Takle Eye Group serves, “I can use my training to do a lot of good.”

When Dr. Baumrind gets home he likes to spend time with his family, and he works hard to match the energy of his two children.


Griffin Eye Clinic & Surgeons is now Takle Eye Group

January 20th, 2016

Category: News

Tags: , ,

Griffin Eye Clinic & Surgeons has changed its name to Takle Eye Group. The practice plans to broaden its specialized eye care and surgery from under one roof. This holistic approach will simplify the process for patients and assure them that all their vision and surgery needs are cared for by the same group of physicians and surgeons they’ve come to know and trust.

The new name and look signal the expansion and growing list of services offered by the practice, including the choice of more specialists and other providers, expanded surgical equipment and techniques, broadened corneal, refractive and glaucoma surgery. These advancements, along with current offerings that include cataract surgery, oculo-plastic surgery, treatments for glaucoma, macular degeneration, dry eyes, and general procedures and screenings, designer eyewear and more, will distinguish Takle Eye Group as the choice for truly holistic eye care.

What will not change is the level and quality of care that has been the standard since Dr. Leiv Takle, Sr. began his practice in Griffin over 40 years ago. Advancements in ophthalmology since 1973 have added increasingly specialized care providers to the practice. But, importantly, these optometrists, ophthalmologists and surgeons are all integral members of the Takle Eye Group team – not external contractors or referral partners.

The new name, Takle Eye Group, thereby reflects the personalized, holistic care that the Takle name has come to stand for, and will be the signpost for quality family eye care for years to come.


back to top
WHERE ARE WE?

Now Open: Takle Eye Group
1075 Bandy Parkway, Suite 110
Locust Grove, GA 30248

Takle Eye Group
646 S 8th Street
Griffin, GA 30224

Phone: 770-228-3836
Fax: 770-412-1733

8:00AM - 5:00PM Monday through Friday

Contact Us