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Tag Archives: eye health

4 Ways To Protect Your Eyes During UV Safety Month

July 29th, 2019

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Lady with white blouse and sunglasses looking at camera.

Welcome to July- national UV safety awareness month! Being the middle of summer, it is the perfect time for a reminder of the damage that the sun can do.

The effects of UV radiation from the sun has some pretty negative effects on our bodies and eyes. Want to avoid the early development of cataracts? UV safety is important! Keep reading for 4 tips on how to protect your eyes this month and every month!

Limit Your Time Outside

The best way to avoid a problem is to avoid its source. Being out of direct contact with the sun for long periods of time will keep your eyes safe from the worst. But nobody wants to stay inside all summer.

You can still have fun during the summer without spending every second of it outside. Be mindful of how long you’ve been at the beach and pack an umbrella to give yourself some shade.

Sunglasses

Of course, we can’t discuss protecting your eyes from the sun without bringing up sunglasses. Both practical and stylish, sunglasses can do as much for your outfit as they can for your eyes. Be warned, though, not all sunglasses are the same.

When you buy your sunglasses, it is important that you check to make sure that they are 100% UV protected. It should be clearly marked on a removable sticker, usually on the lens itself.

You’re worse off wearing sunglasses that don’t have UV protection than no sunglasses. You need to wear sunglasses that protect for UV rays.

Without UV protection, your sunglasses can cause your pupils to dilate when you wear them. This translates to your pupils letting in more light to compensate for the dark tint.

This is bad news for your eyes because you’re letting in more UV rays this way. Here’s the good news: it’s easy to find UV protected sunglasses!

Wear a Wide-Brimmed Hat

Sunglasses do an amazing job of keeping your eyes protected. Want to make sure you’re not letting any extra UV rays in your eyes? Wear a wide-brimmed hat as well.

Yes, you should wear a wide-brimmed hat and a pair of UV protected shades at the same time. It’s all about extra protection people!

There are plenty of hat styles to choose from, so make sure to have fun with it! As long as your hat can provide shade for your eyes, nothing is off the table when it comes to protecting your vision!

Schedule Regular Eye Exams

Having regular eye appointments is important when it comes to maintaining healthy vision. This is true no matter what time of year it may be.

Eye exams are your line of defense against eye conditions. If there is something wrong with your eyes, early detection is key! Treatment is much more effective when it comes early on!

Can’t remember when your last eye exam was? Schedule an exam at Takle Eye Group in Griffin, GA now!


5 Eye Care Tips While Traveling

June 27th, 2019

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Protecting your eyes is a full-time job, even when you’re on vacation or traveling for work. It can be challenging to remember to follow through to keep your eyes safe and healthy!

Keep reading for a few reminders to remember the next time you’re traveling!

Pack Extra Contacts

Don’t only bring enough contacts to last you the trip. Contacts can be easily lost, especially while travelling.

If you’re travelling to a foreign country, it can be even more frustrating. Bring at least 3 more pairs of contacts than you think you’ll need to be safe.

Also, don’t forget to bring plenty of contact solution and any other accessories you may need.

Remember Your Backup Glasses

If you wear contacts, it’s because you are trying to avoid wearing glasses. But it’s important to give your eyes a break from your contacts even if you’re traveling.

Having an extra backup source of vision in case something happens to your contacts doesn’t hurt. You should also bring a repair kit with you. Glasses are fragile, and traveling makes them more likely to accidentally get damaged.

Protect Your Eyes from the Sun

When we think of travelling, we usually think of bright sunny places. This, of course, isn’t always the case, but when it comes to your eyes, it actually doesn’t matter.

Even if you’re going to a place like the U.K. where it’s cloudy for most of the day, you should still wear sunglasses outside. You shouldn’t wear any sunglasses, though.

Make sure to only wear sunglasses that are 100% protected against UV rays. If they are not, they will actually cause more damage than not wearing them at all.

The dark tint to the lenses causes your pupils to reflexively enlarge to allow more light in. More light means more UV radiation, which in turn means more damage to your eyes. It’s best to couple your sunglasses with a wide brimmed hat to maximize protection.

Stay Hydrated and Nourished

Water is very important for your body, including your eyes. Having an abundant amount of water allows your eyes to stay moist throughout the day.

Carry a water bottle with you as you explore your location and refill it as soon as it becomes empty.

It’s also important to eat the right foods. This means plenty of vitamin A, vitamin E, and vitamin E, as well as omega-3 fatty acids.

Eating oily fish like salmon and tuna is a good idea, as well as carrots, sweet potato, citrus fruits, and nuts. These small precautions can save you from the symptoms of dry eye!

Be Proactive With Your Allergies

Don’t forget to bring some allergy medication with you, otherwise, you could spend your trip in misery. Antihistamines will stop your allergic response to itchy eyes. Over the counter eye drops can help keep your eyes hydrated and relieved.

Concerned about the state of your eyes before your next big trip? Schedule an appointment at Takle Eye in Griffin, GA today!


What You Need to Know About the Solar Eclipse

August 15th, 2017

Category: News Takle Eye Group

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“Don’t stare at the sun; you’ll go blind!”

We’ve probably all heard this as kids at some point, and with good reason. The UV light that the sun emits can cause damage to the cells of the cornea in your eye –much like a sunburn on your skin. Can the same damage be done by observing a solar eclipse?

On August 21, 2017, America will be experiencing its first total solar eclipse in 38 years. For a few brief moments, the shadow of the moon will completely obscure the sun, causing total blackness in certain places. People all around the country are selecting the best places to watch this rare celestial event. While it is exciting, watching a solar eclipse can be dangerous to your eye health if the proper precautions are not taken.

So what’s the risk, exactly? During an eclipse the sun is partially blocked; therefore looking directly at it doesn’t produce the same painful effect as it would in full daylight. Therefore, where you might be forced to look away away from direct sunlight, prolonged viewing during a solar eclipse could cause significant damage without your being aware of it.

According to the vision eye institute, Solar Retinopathy can happen when light enters the opening at the front of the eye (called the pupil) and is then focused through the lens of the eye, onto the retina at the back of the eye. There are three kinds of light – visible, infrared and ultraviolet (UV). UV rays in particular can cause damage to the structure of the eye.

With overexposure to UV rays, the radiation literally “cooks” the exposed tissue, destroying the rods and cones of the retina and creating a small blind area. Similar damage can be caused by other intense lights such as a welder’s torch (which is why welders wear highly protective goggles when they are working).

Read more from the Vision Eye Institute

Symptoms often appear later in the evening or the next morning and can include:

  • Sore, watery eyes
  • Discomfort looking at bright lights
  • Difficulty discerning shapes, especially detailed objects
  • Visual distortion of objects
  • Blind spot in the center of your vision

While physicians can help ease discomfort, there is no one treatment or cure for Solar Retinopathy. So, prevention is key! WEARING SUNGLASSES IS NOT ENOUGH PROTECTION. You don’t have to miss out on observing this experience, but make sure you’re aware of the dangers and that everyone in your group wears specially designed solar glasses while viewing the eclipse. Another option is viewing online via NASA’s livestream view page.

For more information on how to experience the solar eclipse safely, read THIS ARTICLE published by the American Academy of Ophthalmology.


A Clearer Picture of Cataract Surgery: Why Lasik Might not be the Answer

October 17th, 2016

Category: Takle Eye Group

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Cataract Surgery: Why Lasik Might not be the Answer

When your vision is less than perfect, it’s easy to jump at a popular treatment, expecting it to be the one for you. Lasik, for example, is the most commonly performed vision correction surgery. It is a highly effective procedure, but for people over age 50 with vision issues it might be worth talking to your doctor about cataract surgery before you go in for Lasik. Once you understand how both cataract surgery and Lasik work, it’s easy to see how important it is to choose the right procedure for your condition.

Cataracts are a clouding of the lens of the eye. They can distort or obscure normal vision. Often, patients will complain of a “film” over the eye, or halos forming around light sources. The only effective treatment of a cataract is surgical removal of the lens.

Cataract surgery is one of the most common and successful surgeries performed in America, with nearly 99 percent of outcomes resulting in improved vision. During cataract surgery, the eye’s natural lens is removed and is replaced with an artificial lens.

Lasik, while it can be helpful in conjunction with cataract surgery, can’t be used alone to treat cataracts. During Lasik, the surgeon uses a laser to reshape the clear refractive bump on the front of the eye, called the cornea, so that light coming into the eye is focused correctly.

Cataracts can’t be improved with laser treatment, but Lasik can be used to address poor vision post-surgery. This generally isn’t necessary, however, as the technology for artificial lenses greatly reduces the likelihood of a patient’s vision needing further adjustment.

So which treatment is right for you? Speak to your eye doctor about any vision issues you may be having, and together you can determine the correct treatment for your needs. Takle Eye Group offers patients a state-of-the-art eye surgery facility and the latest no-stitch small-incision surgical techniques. Schedule your appointment online or by calling 770-228-3836 and find out what we can do to improve your vision.


Take a Hike: Protecting Your Eyes in the Great Outdoors

October 10th, 2016

Category: News Optical Center Takle Eye Optical

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Fall is hiking season, and you’ve likely given plenty of thought to sturdy footwear, suitable clothing, and lightweight gear. But while you’re planning for comfort and protection on the trail, don’t forget your eyes! Being in the great outdoors couldn’t be better than when you’re on nice hike – but so much exposure to the sun, dirt and sand, and other potential dangers could leave your eyes worse for the wear. Luckily, there’s one simple piece of equipment you can bring along to keep your eyes in top condition on the trail: sunglasses.

UV protection is essential for any outdoor activity. You probably know that you need to protect your skin from UV rays, even during regular activities like walking the dogs or mowing the lawn, but do you know the dangers of regularly exposing your eyes to UV rays? Prevent Blindness says that regular exposure may cause macular degeneration – a leading cause of vision loss in older Americans, cataracts, a fleshy growth on the eye called pterygium, and corneal sunburn. Even short-term exposure can cause issues, so the first thing to look for in a pair of hiking sunglasses is UV protection.

Your daily beaters and fashion sunglasses might keep out UVs perfectly well on the trail, but drops and scrapes could leave them useless after just a few hikes. That’s why our second recommendation for a pair of hiking sunglasses is durability. You’re going to drop them; you’re going to fall on them; and you’re probably going to sit on them a few times. Frames made of materials with a little flexibility, or sunglasses designed specifically to flex will be the safest bet for durability.

You want your lenses to be able to hold up too, so that’s why recommendation number three is scratch-resistance. You’ll get grit and sand on them, and you’ll definitely bump into a few trees on a good hike. If your sunglasses rub against a rock or a branch, you don’t want to have a permanent scrape in your line of sight. What fun is a hike if that great view is blocked by a bunch of scratches?

If you’re looking for hiking glasses, we have a few brands and styles you’ll be eager to bring along on the trail. Liberty Sport eyewear is one of our newest brands, and they’re right at home on the field or in the wilderness. We’ve also got Oakleys, in styles that look sharp on the trail or on the street. Visit the Takle Eye Optical showroom or set up an appointment for a fitting at https://www.takleeye.com/optical-center-griffin/ or by calling 770-228-4822


Meet Dr. Gandhi

September 7th, 2016

Category: News Takle Eye Group

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Headshot Of Dr. GandhiDr. Gandhi knew from the start that she was going to pursue a medical degree. As an undergraduate at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, she shadowed dentists, providers with Children’s Hospital at UAB, and other care specialists of all kinds. Dr. Gandhi worked long hours trying to pin down the exact sort of practice she would enjoy most.

As it turned out, the answer lay right on her nose. Dr. Gandhi has needed corrective lenses since her youth – she first found out when she failed her driver’s exam. After a little research and some time shadowing optometrists, she saw that optometry was the field for her. She graduated from UAB with her Doctor of Optometry degree in 2015.

Dr. Gandhi loves that she can dramatically improve the quality of life for her patients, some of whom don’t even realize their need for care. She also likes how quickly common eye ailments can be diagnosed in the clinic, often without any invasive diagnostic procedures.

Takle Eye Group’s Griffin office will be Dr. Gandhi’s primary practice location. Her clinical work will include routine eye exams, contact lens fittings, diabetic monitoring, treatment of common eye diseases, and referral for advanced treatment. She is a member of both the Georgia Optometric and American Optometric Associations, as well as a registered InfantSee provider.

Dr. Gandhi has participated in many community service activities, and she has also traveled to countries in need, such as Uganda and Belize, to provide health care. She loves travel, and in her free time enjoys exploring Atlanta and experiencing everything the city has to offer. Dr. Gandhi speaks both English and Gujarati.


Introducing iStent® – Our Newest Treatment for Glaucoma

August 31st, 2016

Category: News Takle Eye Group

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Takle Eye Group is proud to present our newest procedure for patients who have cataracts and are also managing glaucoma. iStent® Trabecular Micro-Bypass is the first microinvasive glaucoma surgery (MIGS) device to safely reduce pressure in the eye by creating a permanent opening in the drainage network around the eye (called the trabecular meshwork).

The iStent® is the smallest ever FDA-approved medical device. It’s a snorkel-like tube that’s inserted into the trabecular meshwork during cataract surgery. No additional procedure is necessary. Once inserted, iStent® helps manage the flow of aqueous humor – the fluid in your eye – so that excess pressure in the eye is reduced and the danger of permanent damage is lessened.

iStent® may also decrease the need for some glaucoma medications prescribed to you, though this is at the discretion of your doctor.

If you have glaucoma, are planning for cataract surgery, and would like to discuss iStent® as a potential treatment option, contact us for a consultation at http://www.takleeye.com/contact-us/ or by calling 770-228-3836.

For more information on glaucoma, visit our glaucoma center or read our previous article about the two kinds of glaucoma.

INDICATION FOR USE
The iStent® Trabecular Micro-Bypass Stent (Models GTS100R and GTS100L) is indicated for use in conjunction with cataract surgery for the reduction of intraocular pressure (IOP) in adult patients with mild to moderate open-angle glaucoma currently treated with ocular hypotensive medication.

CONTRAINDICATIONS
The iStent is contraindicated in eyes with primary or secondary angle closure glaucoma, including neovascular glaucoma, as well as in patients with retrobulbar tumor, thyroid eye disease, Sturge-Weber Syndrome or any other type of condition that may cause elevated episcleral venous pressure.

WARNINGS
Gonioscopy should be performed prior to surgery to exclude PAS, rubeosis, and other angle abnormalities or conditions that would prohibit adequate visualization of the angle that could lead to improper placement of the stent and pose a hazard. The iStent is MR-Conditional meaning that the device is safe for use in a specified MR environment under specified conditions, please see label for details.

PRECAUTIONS
The surgeon should monitor the patient postoperatively for proper maintenance of intraocular pressure. The safety and effectiveness of the iStent has not been established as an alternative to the primary treatment of glaucoma with medications, in children, in eyes with significant prior trauma, chronic inflammation, or an abnormal anterior segment, in pseudophakic patients with glaucoma, in patients with pseudoexfoliative glaucoma, pigmentary, and uveitic glaucoma, in patients with unmedicated IOP less than 22 mmHg or greater than 36 mmHg after ?washout? of medications, or in patients with prior glaucoma surgery of any type including argon laser trabeculoplasty, for implantation of more than a single stent, after complications during cataract surgery, and when implantation has been without concomitant cataract surgery with IOL implantation for visually significant cataract.

ADVERSE EVENTS
The most common post-operative adverse events reported in the randomized pivotal trial included early post-operative corneal edema (8%), BCVA loss of = 1 line at or after the 3 month visit (7%), posterior capsular opacification (6%), stent obstruction (4%) early post-operative anterior chamber cells (3%), and early post-operative corneal abrasion (3%). Please refer to Directions for Use for additional adverse event information.

CAUTION
Federal law restricts this device to sale by, or on the order of, a physician. Please reference the Directions for Use labeling for a complete list of contraindications, warnings, precautions, and adverse events.


Protecting Young Eyes – Caring for Your Children’s Eye Health

August 25th, 2016

Category: Takle Eye Group

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As a parent, you do everything in your power to make sure your children are healthy. That includes protecting them from injury, making sure their nutritional needs are met, and bringing them to the doctor’s office for the occasional checkup. But how often do you consider the health of your children’s eyes? The National Center for Children’s Eye Health reports that 9 percent of children between 5 and 17 years of age are nearsighted, and 13 percent are farsighted. Further, between 15 and 28 percent of children ages 5 to 17 have astigmatism. Uncorrected vision problems in young children (6 to 72 months of age) can affect their cognitive and visual-motor development, and visual function is a strong predictor of academic performance in school-age children.

The best way to prevent vision-related development issues in your children is to schedule regular vision screenings with your eyecare provider, so that problems can be detected early and treatment can be administered as soon as possible. Infants should have their vision checked as part of regular pediatric checkups for the first three years. Between the ages of 3 and 6, an eye exam every year is recommended. Throughout childhood and the teenage years, exams should be scheduled as necessary.

Of course, not all vision issues are genetic. Proactive protection is the best way to prevent damage to children’s eyes from common accidents and other dangers. Preventblindness.org lists the most common causes of eye injuries to children as:

  • Misuse of toys
  • Falls from beds, against furniture, and on stairs
  • Misuse of everyday objects such as work and garden tools, kitchen utensils, knives, and pens and pencils.
  • Contact with household products such as paint, detergents, glues, etc.
  • Automobile crashes or accidents

Luckily, protecting your child’s eyes from injury involves some steps that you may already be taking, such as using proper occupant restraints (car seats, safety belts) in your vehicles, keeping chemicals out of reach of children, padding the corners of your furniture, and reading the warnings on packaging and toys. In addition to these steps, Prevent Blindness recommends installing locks on floor-level kitchen and bathroom cabinetry, avoiding flying or projectile-throwing toys, installing sufficient stairwell lighting and handrails, keeping BB guns away from children, and stowing or securing any loose objects while driving a vehicle. You can find the full list of recommendations on the Prevent Blindness website.

You should also consider specialized sports eye protection. Swim goggles will protect from irritants in pool or ocean water, and there are goggles and eye shields widely available in children’s sizes for almost every sport. Many sports goggles, especially those with lenses made of polycarbonate, include UV protection. UV protection is an important consideration for everyday protection as well, The Vision Council reports that children generally experience three times as much sun exposure as adults—thus their eyes are more likely to be exposed to UV rays. Protect your children’s eyes in the outdoors by shopping for a suitable pair of sunglasses with them. To be sure your child is more likely to wear their sunglasses, have them pick out a pair they like, make sure the sunglasses fit properly, and look into clip-ons if your child already wears prescription glasses. Be sure that the sunglasses are UVA/UVB protective!

Ensuring the health and safety of your children’s eyes is just one part of being a parent. Takle Eye Group can help make it easier. Call 770-228-3836 or request an appointment online to set up an examination or screening, and trust your children’s eye health to the same providers who care for your own.


Under Pressure – What is Glaucoma?

June 21st, 2016

Category: Takle Eye Group

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Under Pressure - What is Glaucoma?

Your eyes are under a lot of pressure. The front of the eye constantly produces a fluid called aqueous humor. Small amounts of aqueous humor accumulate or drain off, helping the eye maintain optimal pressure. Blockage can occur, though, and insufficient drainage can lead to high pressure in the eye and possible damage to the optical nerve. This is the condition known as glaucoma, and there are two types to be aware of.

The most common form of glaucoma is open-angle. Open-angle glaucoma develops slowly, with age. Often, open-angle glaucoma presents no symptoms in its early stages. The worst one might notice is restricted peripheral vision, but, as the disease progresses, blank spots begin to form in a patient’s vision. If left untreated, glaucoma can result in total blindness. The best way to avoid permanent vision loss is to have regular eye exams. The sooner glaucoma is diagnosed and treated, the better.

A less common form of glaucoma is closed-angle. Closed-angle glaucoma is an eye emergency; it happens quickly and is painful. Angle closure happens when the pupil moves or dilates and blocks the drainage angles in the eye. Vision damage happens very quickly in closed-angle glaucoma, and the symptoms are so painful and dramatic that most patients seek medical help immediately.

To find out more about glaucoma symptoms, risk factors, and treatments visit http://www.takleeye.com/glaucoma-center-griffin/. There you’ll find a helpful video that explains exactly what’s going on when drainage is stopped, and what treatments are available to mitigate damage and return the eyes to normal function.


On Again off Again – Buying Glasses Online vs. In-Store

June 14th, 2016

Category: Takle Eye Optical

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Buying glasses online vs in store

The online marketplace has reduced the shopping process for millions of custom items, like shoes, clothing and décor, to a few clicks. Shopping for glasses can also be reduced to a fully at-home experience, but unlike clothes and books, glasses are engineered for a unique medical purpose.

Shopping for glasses online can be convenient, but there are a number of drawbacks to consider – especially if what you need is a pair of prescription glasses. Online glasses retailers offer measurement services and can even manufacture prescription lenses, but the options for a custom fit are limited. Higher-power prescriptions and specialty lenses require more precise facial measurements, and the margin of error is much slimmer. Even trained optometrists have a difficult time making their own facial measurements in a mirror.

Fit and style are important considerations for anyone who wants a pair of glasses. Try-on methods vary from site to site, and the effectiveness of these methods also varies widely. In-home try-on programs are the best way to find out how a pair of frames will fit your face when you’re shopping online, but not all online retailers provide such programs. Brick-and-mortar stores not owned by a manufacturer also will carry a wide variety of designer frames to help pin down your exact style.

One last tip: a local optical shop may offer repair or alteration services on their glasses that are unavailable from online stores. As you get used to the fit of your new glasses, it’s useful to be able to visit a store and have them adjust parts of the frame while you wait.

So, the right place to find glasses depends on what you need and want. If you need a low-power prescription and you’re willing to try a few online fittings to find the right frame, shopping online might be right for you. If you’re in need of a powerful prescription or precision lens and more confidence in the style of your frames, it might be wise to stop by an optical store and try on a few pairs.

If you’re looking for unique, custom-fit frames or a place where you can get specialty lenses crafted just for you, look no further than Takle Eye Optical – Takle Eye Group’s own optical shop. We carry popular brands and economy frames to light up your face. Find out more at http://www.takleeye.com/optical-center-griffin/ or call 770-228-4822 to schedule an appointment.


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Now Open: Takle Eye Group
1075 Bandy Parkway, Suite 110
Locust Grove, GA 30248

Takle Eye Group
646 S 8th Street
Griffin, GA 30224

Phone: 770-228-3836
Fax: 770-412-1733

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